Friday, April 12, 2013

A Simple Brain Musing

Just a simple brain musing about the relationship between straight men and our thoughts on our chances with the opposite sex.

It's probably true that, despite constant evidence to the contrary presenting itself to us almost daily, most, if not all, straight men, no matter their appearance or temperament, think they have at least a good chance of successfully wooing any women they find attractive. As you can imagine, a lot of straight men spend their days wallowing in pools of deep disappointment.

Thank you for your interest.

Monday, February 11, 2013

The Death of Death is FREE on Smashwords

My short novel, The Death of Death, is free on Smashwords for a limited time, so take a look at it if you will. There's nothing better than FREE, is there?

The Death of Death: Smashwords edition


Death guides usually have rather normal names like John, Mary, Harry, and Jessica. And even ones not quite so normal, like Bartholomew or Ambrosia. They also have the most interesting tales behind their deaths. But one particular death guide has a few problems: she cannot remember her name or the details of her demise, and thus has no story of her own. One fateful night, she meets a young girl that may change her death forever.

Inspired by the works of Tim Burton and Neil Gailman, and in the style of Children's tales of old, The Death of Death is a tragic, yet sweet little tale about loss and acceptance.

Suitable for ages 12 and up.




Saturday, February 9, 2013

An excerpt from The Death of Death

Here is an excerpt from The Death of Death.

It's from a character that has been, throughout the years, incorrectly referred to as the one and only Death, and this is the story of how he came to be known.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed writing it.


"Once upon a lifetime, of whose I will not say, but it may very well be my own,
I did a fair bit of ferrying and I did it all alone.
And one day, I came across a farmer, very old yet still very able,
As he worked with a scythe in his hands on a field of crops of some unknown staple.
And he saw me and welcomed me with open arms and he asked, ‘Is it my time?’
And I answered truthfully, as I always do, ‘Yes, I am afraid it is. You are well past your prime.’
And ready was he, but before he perished wanted to have one last conversation,
So he asked me to listen, and listen I did, without hesitation.
And he told me of his family, the members of which had passed well before him and whom he loved a lot, And he told me of all his dreams and all his nightmares, and which of which came true and which did not.
He told me his beliefs and some were silly and some weren’t quite, But a silly one was one of a dragon he had seen that he thought was an exquisite sight.
We had spoken for hours and with no one around to grieve,
He exclaimed to me that he was now quite ready to leave.
And as he lay down he confessed to me of his dying wish, to die with his trusty scythe at his side, And he folded his arms with a final breath and he closed his eyes and died.
And as per the farmer’s last wish, I picked up his tool,
But before I could lay it down beside him another came and screamed at the sight of me, he screamed like a fool.
And so, with tool in hand, I made a hasty retreat,
And now I am forever known as the terrifying skeleton in a hood with a scythe, and with that, my story is complete."




The Death of Death for the Nook 
The Death of Death for the Kindle 
The Death of Death on Smashwords
The Death of Death on Kobo
The Death of Death for the Kindle UK


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

The Death of Death finally available for the Nook


Well, it's taken a while (and by while I mean a whole month, wow), but The Death of Death is finally available for the Nook.

Despite its acceptance into Smashword.com's premium catalog, which is suppose to fast track your book into every major retailer of ebooks (except Amazon due to details they are currently working out with one another, supposedly), it never showed up on the Barnes & Noble's site.

So, I finally took liberties and uploaded it directly to Barnes & Noble's site myself and now, it's finally available there.

So, if you own a Nook, have at it. And it's cheap, at 99¢. So what do you have? You know, except a measly 99¢.

If you enjoy the works of Tim Burton and/or Neil Gaiman, this is neither, but it may very well resemble both.

Here are the links:

The Death of Death for the Nook 

The Death of Death for the Kindle 

The Death of Death on Smashwords

The Death of Death on Kobo

The Death of Death for the Kindle UK

It's also available through iBooks if you just do a search for K. N. Parker.



Saturday, January 26, 2013

A Giacchino scored Star Wars perhaps...?


 


Ok, now I believe it. J.J. Abrams is now the most powerful man in the geek universe, as he is now in control of the two "Star" franchises. I've also just realized that, if for any reason John Williams doesn't return, there is potential for a Michael Giacchino scored Star Wars! I've always thought of Giacchino as, not the next Williams, but as someone whose style is the most reminiscent of Williams out of all of the new generation of composers.

I for one enjoyed the new Star Trek, and with the man responsible for the script for the wonderful Toy Story 3, Michael Ardnt, along with the high probability that Giacchino might be along for the ride, I am quite excited for the new Star Wars and 2015 cannot come fast enough. 


Also, there are still copies of this around because, you know, it's digital and presumably there will be copied of it around, you know, forever.



Here's the UK link as well: The Death of Death UK

Sunday, January 20, 2013

The Death of Death in more formats

Hello all. The Death of Death is now available through Kobo.com and the iTunes iBook store. Although, I find it horrible difficult to search for personally, I hope people are able to find it some way, somehow.

I've also realized that I've never given a description of it through this blog. That would be helpful. So, here it is:

Death guides usually have rather normal names like John, Mary, Harry, and Jessica. And even ones not quite so normal, like Bartholomew or Ambrosia. They also have the most interesting tales behind their deaths. But one particular death guide has a few problems: she cannot remember her name or the details of her demise, and thus has no story of her own. One fateful night, she meets a young girl that may change her death forever.

Inspired by and in the style of Children's tales of old, The Death of Death is a tragic, yet sweet little tale about loss and acceptance.


In my estimation, it's suitable for ages 12 and up.

Here's the UK link as well: AMAZON.CO.UK

I think the brits may find some enjoyment in this. And maybe it would find its way to Stephen Fry somehow. In a perfect world, Stephen Fry would narrate this and all would be right with it the world.

And remember, it's Tim Burton-esque!


Friday, January 18, 2013

List of cognitive biases or: Why you're probably wrong about anything you've ever thought

It's fascinating what our brain does to screw with us.

I'd like to share with you all a pretty extensive list of why your thinking in everyday life is mostly likely extremely flawed. And if you find fault with any of this, there's probably something on this list that explains why you're wrong. And if I'm wrong about any of this there's probably something on this list that explains why I was wrong. You can see where I'm going with this.

But perhaps this list can lead to the creation of some pretty interesting characters. You could create someone that adheres to so many of these that it severely impairs their journey. Or someone Sherlock Holmes-like that is so hyper aware of these biases that it annoys every character he or she comes into contact with, potentially severely impairing his or her journey. I prefer the latter personally.

Here's the list, courtesy of WikipediaList of cognitive biases

Read, it, study it, live your life better!

A link to the io9 post that inspired this post: The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational